• Inlay and Stringing for Edwardian Envelope Table

    I used cross banded mahogany inlay for the Envelope Table project in the September/October 2010 issue to more closely match the antique samples I researched for the project. The process was too long to include in the article, but if you want to make your own, here are the instructions. Instructions are also included for making the holly stringing strips used. The banding is made up of cross grained mahogany with black edges. I ordered dyed…

  • Owain Harris: Serious Furniture (with Whimsy)

    Owain Harris’s first introduction to a woodworking-related field came as he joined a framing crew in mid 1990s New England. He was motivated both by romantic notions about building a house and, as a 22-year-old bartender, by “realizing that working till 2 a.m. and then staying up till dawn shooting pool was probably not a healthy way to live your life.” As a framer, he discovered that he really loved working with wood and making things, but the…

  • Readers on Nut Woods

    Last week’s editorial was about nuts: tree nuts, in particular, and wood that comes from those trees. We heard about readers’ favorite nut woods for woodworking. – Editor “My favorite ‘nutty’ woods are walnut and cherry, with red oak used more because it’s cheaper!” – Dale Smith “I have only worked with beech. I like its toughness and strength for projects that take a beating. On one occasion, I used it to build a f…

  • Not Your Typical Woods for Turning

    In the last issue, Rob asked about your thoughts and experiences with common (i.e., not exotic), but nontypical, hardwoods that have been better for woodturning than for flat work. Here’s a few thoughts from readers on a variety of species. – Editor “Two which can be found occasionally, which I really enjoy, are apple and rhododendron. Both turn well and you will find both grain and color not common to other woods.” – Chris Byers “Ho…

  • Federal Serpentine Table

    …I made this Federal serpentine table in a class at the Furniture Institute of Massachusetts. The primary wood is cherry with cocobolo inlays and holly stringing. Since the shellac caused the cocobolo to bleed, I ended up using Hydrocote water-based lacquer for the finish. The top is marble. Bruce D. Wedlock North Reading, MA See the Gallery Below: federal-serpantine-table-2 federal-serpantine-table-5 federal-serpantine-table-6…

  • To Infinity and Beyond!

    As soon as I laid the Router Emergency Kit on the table at my guild’s board meeting, I knew I’d have to keep an eye on it. As it passed from hand to hand ,the comments ranged from, “Now, that’s a good idea; it’s exactly what I need” to the inevitable, “Can I have it?” No wonder. The kit is a clever assortment of replacement bearings, screws, washers and stop collars for router bits. It’s the…

  • How to Make the Most of My Old B&D Table Saw?

    I bought an old (1983) Black & Decker 8″ table saw model 9419. The size of the table saw is about 36″ in length if I’m correct (since I have not measured yet). This table saw seems small, but I would like professional opinions on how I could make the best of it for any type of job. The other concern I have is the blade size: the biggest size it can use is 8″. That size is hard to get since no one makes them any…

  • Stickley-Inspired Prairie Style Settle

    Today Gustav is the best-remembered of the Stickley brothers, but the other four — Albert, Charles, Leopold and John George — were active in the furniture business as well, with all of the brothers working for and against each other in a staggering number of combinations. Leopold and John George incorporated L & J. G. Stickley in 1904, originally manufacturing Arts & Crafts furniture before adapting to changing tastes. The company sur…