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View Full Version : beaded plywood on garage walls....HOW TO????



stevewitt
05-22-2006, 11:07 AM
When hanging the beaded plywood on textured drywall coated garage walls, Do you just hang it right on top to the existing drywall surface??? What, if any, is the preparation involved. It seems like I have seen where they cut out horizontal sections of the drywall out and then fix boards in there (maybe as thick as drywall) to attach the beaded plywood to. Can anyone elaborate??? Thanks in advance!!

cabinetman
05-22-2006, 03:21 PM
Need a few details to help you. What is the thickness of the plywood? Is there to be any esthetics to this plywood or just for hangin' stuff?
Is the ply to go from floor to ceiling? Do you know what's behind the drywall (furring strips on block?)?
:)
:*
:D
I'M NEVER WRONG - BUT I'M NOT ALWAYS RIGHT"

stevewitt
05-23-2006, 01:19 AM
>Need a few details to help you. What is the thickness of
>the plywood? Is there to be any esthetics to this plywood or
>just for hangin' stuff?
>Is the ply to go from floor to ceiling? Do you know what's
>behind the drywall (furring strips on block?)?
>:)
>:*
>:D
>I'M NEVER WRONG - BUT I'M NOT ALWAYS RIGHT"


Plywood is for looks and function of protecting walls. I believe it is 1/4" or 3/8" thick. Its the good stuff from Lowe's (heavy duty) and looks like wainscot beaded paneling 4x8 sheets. Want to install from floor to 8' high(garage ceiling is something like 12' high. Behind drywall is 16"oc studs. House is 1.5years old (drees). Will also cap and base mold it. Thanks for the help.

cabinetman
05-23-2006, 07:34 AM
There are a few ways to do this, I'll mention three. The first and easiest if you're not really in the mood to do it is to get some Liquid Nail, or panel adhesive and mount it right to the drywall. Second, a little better method, cause maybe your mood improved is to nail it up on the drywall where the drywall is secured to the furring strips. Third, and probably the most labor intensive would be to fur out the wall with strips running cross ways to the strips that hold the drywall, and nail up panel. If you use the panel adhesive idea, taking down the panels later will be hard and you'll have a messed up drywall.
:)
:*
:D
"I'M NEVER WRONG - BUT I'M NOT ALWAYS RIGHT"

Danford C Jennings
05-23-2006, 07:53 AM
Steve,

Personally, I'd glue and nail the sheets right over the sheetrock. You'll be nailing to the studs with ring shanked panel nails. FWIW.

Dano

Mark F
05-23-2006, 07:56 AM
I would nail it into the studs, preferably with a finish nailer or brad nailer so at least 1/2 inch of nail penetrates the studs. Without air I would use a hammer and paneling nails long enough to hit the studs.


Mark F

stevewitt
05-23-2006, 08:10 AM
OK, Thanks. Now, how would you guys handle the bottom of the panel. the reason I ask is because the garage foundation is exposed for about the first 6 to 8 inches of height at the bottom and then the drywall starts. The concrete to this is set back the thickness of the drywall (actually where the bottom of the drywall board is) on the two sides and then actually prodrudes outward a little from the bottom on the back wall. I figured to finish the look that I am going for....I wanted the panels to reach the floor and then put some heavy duty base molding. By the way, Is there a standard or traditional height that this type of garage wainscot treatment goes...I know that I said the entire height of the sheet (8feet) but if there is a more asthetic traditional height that has proven good looks, I will cut it down to that height.

Danford C Jennings
05-23-2006, 08:34 AM
Steve,

Wainscotting is typically 36"-38"...If your wall height is 12', you could go as high as 48".

You will need to glue furring strips, same thickness as the sheetrock, to the foundation using Liquid Nails or similar construction adhesive. One strip at the floor/foundation joint and another strip at the height of your baseboard. Only concern I would have is moisture. This may or may not be a problem in your case but, if there is some moisture wicking through, you could seal the exposed foundation wall with epoxy floor paint before applying the furring strips.

Dano

cabinetman
05-23-2006, 08:39 AM
You will have to install horizontal framing to hold the bottom of the panel and be a nailer for the base. Traditionally, wainscoting is usually between 34" and 45" above finished floor. It is usually finished at the top with a decorative moulding or a chair rail. At the bottom is your base moulding. The height you pick will be an asthetic one based on what height will look pleasing to you with relation to the size of the room, ceiling height and color combos.
:)
:*
:D
I"M NEVER WRONG - BUT I'M NOT ALWAYS RIGHT"

stevewitt
05-23-2006, 08:53 AM
>Steve,
>
>Wainscotting is typically 36"-38"...If your wall height is
>12', you could go as high as 48".
>
>You will need to glue furring strips, same thickness as the
>sheetrock, to the foundation using Liquid Nails or similar
>construction adhesive. One strip at the floor/foundation
>joint and another strip at the height of your baseboard.
>Only concern I would have is moisture. This may or may not
>be a problem in your case but, if there is some moisture
>wicking through, you could seal the exposed foundation wall
>with epoxy floor paint before applying the furring strips.
>
>Dano


Thanks Dano,
one more question. Since the garage floor slants(graded) from the back wall to the driveway(for drainage I guess), How would I handle this. Obviously, the top of the panels will be installed to a level line at the 48" height. Should I just measure from the level line to the floor and then cut to sort of scribe each panel for the slope. And then for the base trim, should it just follow the floor's grade which would cause a difference in the height of the top of the wainscot panel treatment and the top of the base trim at the front and back of the garage sidewalls. I don't think it will be a huge difference but is that how it is done. Thanks so much for the help.

Danford C Jennings
05-23-2006, 12:12 PM
Steve,

Especially with a wainscot treatmeant, it's amazing what the human eye can discern in terms of level and plumb....

To make things easier, always start at the "high" side. So your reference point will be a back corner, measure up from the floor to your desired height. Then pull a measurement from the ceiling down to that mark, this will be the distance you use to make your mark at the other end of the wall (pulling from the ceiling), then snap your line. Measure up from the floor and you'll get the slope in inches.

I wouldn't be inclined to scribe the bottom of every piece, I'd cut the first sheet at 48", hang it, then measure down from the edge to floor and cut the next sheet at that length, and so on. The baseboard will cover the staggered joints. Standard baseboard is 3 1/2" wide (tall). Knowing what the total slope is should determine how wide of base to use because of the resulting taper cuts you'll make on the bottoms of your boards...

Dano

stevewitt
05-23-2006, 03:57 PM
hey Dano,
when you are talkin about measuring down from the ceiling to create the height line for the panels...what if the line created from these two measurements (high side first, then the low side)is not completely level. Can't I just mark a spot on the high corner and then use a laser level to create the line everywhere? Thanks.

Danford C Jennings
05-23-2006, 08:01 PM
Steve,

The key, in my view, is that all lines are paralell to the ceiling (things will then appear "level"). But, hey, if you have a laser level, that will make layout pretty much a no brainer. You'll still need to know what the slope is, though, for the tapered cuts I mentioned previously...

Dano

lobsta1
05-26-2006, 10:30 PM
I may be all wet, but if this is to remain a garage, doesn't having a plywood wall violate fire codes? If there is ever a fire wouldn't the insurance company have grounds to not pay off?
Al

stevewitt
05-27-2006, 10:17 PM
not sure....but good point. Georgia-Pacific Plytanium beaded plyboard boasts this as one of their uses though. I need to ask someone from my homeowner's insurance.

Danford C Jennings
05-28-2006, 09:10 AM
Steve,

Since this is wainscotting going over sheetrock, I'd be truely astounded if it weren't within code....FWIW.

Dano

stevewitt
05-28-2006, 09:41 AM
I would hope it is no big deal because I have seen this wainscot treatment in garages in the higher costing homes too. I love a good looking/functioning garage. I like having my two garage doors up while doing yardwork etc. and then some neighbors come over to see whats going on. I think when your garage doors stay open it seems inviting to some. I'm also gonna put up a giant round Coca-Cola clock with the neon light on it and some home-built sturdy cabinets (painted to complement the wainscot and other wall colors) and workbench created with my "Kreg" pocket-hole jig. It may even become more ambitious than this when things get rollin'.

stevewitt
05-31-2006, 04:56 PM
Just one more detail before I start. As I mentioned this is going to be applied on top of "TEXTURED" sheetrock. Should I attempt to smooth or remove the drywall textured(Mud) before applying the plywood treatment. It is fairly built up and looks like a thick application. If I should remove.....please tell how. Thanks in advance.

Danford C Jennings
06-01-2006, 08:17 AM
Steve,

I wouldn't think it neccessary; it's not like the wainscotting is wallpaper. However, after you've run the chair rail, or whatever cap treatment you use, running a small bead of caulk might be adviseable to fill any gaps...FWIW.

Dano

srpoly
06-02-2006, 11:51 AM
Just to throw into the mix.
If you choose to go with a 48"ish hieght, start you project my measuring from your low point, not the high point. This doesn't mean you should start your application from the low point.
But if you start with the high point, and start cutting 4x8 sheets in ... HALF... you'll wind up spending a full sheet to create a 50" piece.
FWIW...

Danford C Jennings
06-03-2006, 08:53 AM
That's a valid point, Dave...

My garage is 26' deep, the slope is just a tad over 1". If I were to wainscott with base board, I'd still start at the high end, even if I went 48" high (which I wouldn't since my ceilings are only 8'); it's an asthetic thingy since my mechanic bench, tools, and cabs are on the back wall...The baseboard would cover the difference.

Dano

stevewitt
06-22-2006, 11:17 AM
Hey Danford, Thanks for all the help. Getting read to finally start this project this weekend but something puzzling me. On the back wall of the garage, there is a door with trim to enter the house and also the back wall is where the foundation actually "protrudes" a little (looking at it left to right, it starts flush with the sheetrock on the left and then gradually starts to protrude to an inch and a half at the far right) beyond the bottom of the sheetrock.

Question #1) When hanging this stuff on that back wall, Should I just butt the beaded plyboard up against the exsisting door trim and then a small piece of trim over this butted joint? Or how would you do this to make it look right.

Question #2) how should I handle the uneven protrusion of the foundation wall at the bottom of the sheetrock to deal with the plyboard and basemold. (actually not sure yet what I'm gonna use for the base mold...open to suggestions on this too)

Danford C Jennings
06-22-2006, 08:34 PM
Steve,

Well, normally on a paneled wall, the trim goes on last. However, since this is wainscotting, notching out the door casing really isn't practicle, so I'd butt the panel to the casing. Make sure the butt end is cut perfectly straight, then hit it with a sanding block. When you hang it, start at the end opposite of the door, making sure it's between a 32nd and a 16th long. Then bow the panel so the edge butts against the casing, you'll end up getting a tight enough fit where you won't need to cover the joint with an applied moulding.

The sloping foundation wall presents another challenge and I'm wondering what the carps did with the door casing at that point. I think you should elaborate a tad, 'cause I'm thinking that the wall needs to be furred out......

Dano

stevewitt
06-22-2006, 11:45 PM
It looks like the concrete footwall(foundation) that the garage wall's bottom plate (framing) is fixed to was just not squared properly. Then the carpenters come along and snap their chalk lines and build a square structure on top of an unsquare foundation leaving that protrusion. At least, this is what it appears to be to me. Sad thing is...the inch and a half that I quoted above is not a "guesstimate", I actually measured it and it is really that far off. Drees home.

Danford C Jennings
06-23-2006, 07:24 AM
Sounds like you need to fur out the wall...That door casing must look like a real cobble job....

Dano