Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    St Paul, MN, USA.
    Posts
    140

    Benchtop - question #100001

    Good day everyone

    I have a large benchtop that I've created by laminating strips of 6/4 maple. It's approx 21"x 96" x 3".

    I am planning to laminate 1 strip of maple and 1 strip of paduak togethor and use that piece for edging around the perimeter, with mitered corners. (I'm planning to use biscuits to attach the edging.)

    I'm a little concerned with my ability to get those miters airtight as the long pieces are 8' in length. I've put a lot of time and money into this project - and am on the home stretch and dont want to make a critical error at this juncture. I can use butt joints, I suppose, but the miters will look better IMO.

    ***Does anyone have any suggestions or tips on creating airtight miters with longer pieces of stock? In the past, I've cut my miters on an old mitersaw. The results are usually a little disappointing.

    ***Breadboard ends:
    This is something I would just like to know more about - specifically, how does one create them? My benchtop weighs a good 150 lbs. What are the advantages to using BB ends?

    ***Finally, I'm using a lamination of maple and paduak for the edging - for purely aesthetic reasons. I havent worked with many exotic species before - is there any reason that paduak would NOT create a good face-glued bond with maple? Are there any considerations I should take into account? I can just as easily use red oak, or another domestic species, but I have this nice stick of paduak and though it would make nice edging around the light maple.

    As always, thanks for taking the time to read my questions, and double thanks to those who respond.

    Doug




  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada.
    Posts
    1,807

    RE: Benchtop - question #100001

    A mitered frame will not allow for expansion or shrinkage of the top, that is why a breadboard end is often used on a table top to cover the end grain.

    A method of doing a breadboard end is explained here:
    http://sawsndust.com/a-breadboard.htm


    Sawdust Making 101
    http://sawdustmaking.com
    Frank C

    Sawdust Making 101
    http://sawdustmaking.com

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA.
    Posts
    3,491

    RE: Benchtop - question #100001

    Frank's right ...

    A 21" wide solid slab of maple is gonna swell and shrink - maybe as much as 1/4" overall (more likely about 1/8, but the swing may go up as well as down).

    Tradition is dovetails. But don't glue the two end boards, just let the dovetails hold 'em in place. This means your tails go on the long sides and your pins go on the short ones. Glue the long sides on and let the short ends float. You could bolt them in, too. This is the method I went with on my 24x75" bench.

    Breadboard ends are another way to go. I'm not a fan of the look so I shy away from it, but it's perfectly acceptable. A breadboard end offers the hiding of most of your end grain and it can actually prevent cupping of the main panel to some degree. It needs to be mounted in such a way that wood movement is considered, obviously.

    As for the Padauk face gluing, yes, there may be trouble getting a good face-bond. There are oils in Padauk that can mess with glue stickage. The common solution is to wipe down the face with acetone, let it flash off and immediately apply the glue. That should get you a better bond. Though it may be tricky to pull off with such a large surface area. I'm not sure how much time you have, probably hours, before the oil works its way back up to the surface. I'd scrub good with the acetone just to be sure.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    St Paul, MN, USA.
    Posts
    140

    RE: Benchtop - question #100001

    Thanks guys. I'm reading up on breadboard ends and I think thats the way to go.

    One thing - the benchtop surface is all sidegrain - so the expansion/contraction should all be vertical, not horizontal - correct?

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Garden Grove, CA, USA.
    Posts
    1,220

    RE: Benchtop - question #100001

    Wood expands the most along the width or in your case vertically, but wood also expands in thickness, in your case horizontal. Wood doesn't really expand in length. So you do still need to keep it in consideration the larger the glueup the more distance it will move.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA.
    Posts
    3,491

    RE: Benchtop - question #100001

    What David said.

    Do keep in mind, though, that the cut of each board is important, too. If it's all quarter sawn, it'll pretty much move the same percentage in both directions. Flat sawn moves in width more than it does in thickness. And rift sawn and the other in-between grain orientations will be some combination of these so it's tough to predict just how much it will move. Best to think worst-case and plan for that much :D



  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    St Paul, MN, USA.
    Posts
    140

    RE: Benchtop - question #100001

    Craig -

    They are exactly the same! I built a prototype bench where I used butt joints on the skirt and affixed them with lag bolts. This worked fine. After getting the usual awesome and insightful feedback from the forum, I am going to go with breadboard ends in lieu of a traditional skirt.



  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Bradford, Vermont, MerryCanna.
    Posts
    18,751

    RE: Benchtop - question #100001

    Yeah, no - blow off the miters 'cause they're gonna' blow themselves off anyway. Breadboard ends will work AS LONG AS they're glued ONLY in the center or at ONE (front, usually) END ONLY. Don't try to glue 'em along the full width of the top, or they, too, will blow right back off. Or... much more commonly... leave the ends as ends & be happy with it. Maple's fine for direct exposure of the end grain. Do seal it like crazy with something, but heck - why cover it?

    Shouldn't be any problem gluing maple & padauk together, as long as the grain on both runs the same direction or the joint is small. Edge-laminating or face-laminating is fine.

    -- Tim --

    Member of the
    Robert "Limey" Bolton Memorial
    International
    Volunteer Mentorship and Assistance
    Programme

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA.
    Posts
    1,309

    RE: Benchtop - question #100001

    Cool! Make sure you post some pics when it's done. I'll do the same. Mine should have been done months and months ago, but the danged thing is so heavy I can't lift the benchtop by myself, and I need to get it up on some sawhorses and flipped around this way and that to get it finished. Consequently it continues to slip down the list and will probably continue to do so until I run into a project that absolutely requires a workbench in order to do it. And at that point I'll need it done NOW. ;)

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    St Paul, MN, USA.
    Posts
    140

    RE: Benchtop - question #100001

    Thanks tim - I am procedding w breadboard ends, but what would I use to seal the endgrain if I left them be?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •