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  1. #1
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    Newbie with the most stupid question.

    Hello everyone. Just getting into woodworking in an "almost" serious way. Meaning I actually bought some tools...

    I define myself as handy, I do all repairs at home, fix my car (well, not anymore..but used to), plumbing, electricity, masonry...never afraid of tackling anything. Of course woodworking had to be added to my skills; just turned 50 so it's either now or never. Woodworking, huh? That's easy. Anyone can do it. Ha! That's what I thought until I realized that you first need to learn how to measure...and how to mark your pieces. Who would've thought that a tiny difference that no one can ever notice, can make those beautiful plans you have in your head, come out so mediocre...
    Hats off to all the artists that can make things straight and square :)
    Anyway, here's the first question. I have a 10" table saw. I need a blade for box joints and can only find it in 8". Other than the obvious reduction in cut depth, is there anything unsafe about using an 8" blade in a 10" saw? See? I told you it was a stupid question.

    Thanks in advance for any help on this one and all the others that are coming (I'm already working on the next one....related to jointing with a router table.....it just does not work as it should).

  2. #2
    Member cabinetman's Avatar
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    RE: Newbie with the most stupid question.

    Not a stupid question at all. You can use an 8" blade without a problem, as long as the arbor hole is the same and you mount the blade with the right direction.

  3. #3
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    RE: Newbie with the most stupid question.

    Thanks. That's what I thought.....but better safe than sorry.


  4. #4
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    RE: Newbie with the most stupid question.

    Ok. I lied. My second question will not be about jointing.

    Wood filler.

    I am making a big frame out of maple. Doing mortise and tenons. There are a few gaps that I want to cover with wood filler. What's a good filler that would be easy to apply, and not stand out too much? I have not decided if I will stain or leave natural, but just in case it should accept stain.
    Oh, and if it can be machined it's a plus.

    Thanks!!!

  5. #5
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    Nashville, TN, US.
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    RE: RE%3A Newbie with the most stupid question.

    A good friend of mine swears by a product called famowood. I've never used it, but apparently it stains well doesn't shrink, etc. It's a bit pricey, and you have to order it in the species that matches your project. Here's a link to Rockler's page http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=18537

    James

  6. #6
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    RE: RE%3A Newbie with the most stupid question.

    Thanks James!

    I see Rockler only carries the solvent based filler, and found a water based famowood at Woodcraft. Cheaper too at $3.99 for a pint. Would it be as good?

    http://www.woodcraft.com/Catalog/Pro...4-dc8a321a2f50

  7. #7
    Member cabinetman's Avatar
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    RE: RE%3A Newbie with the most stupid question.

    I haven't used the WB version yet. I will say the solvent base works good. Using a filler may draw more attention to the gaps. Filler never visually disappears.

    Can the gaps be closed up with glue and clamps, or is it too late?

  8. #8
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    RE: RE%3A Newbie with the most stupid question.

    Here's the thing. The boards were not completely straight. I tried jointing with a router table but that didn't work. Good thing I tested elsewhere first. So I decided to go ahead and do the mortises with the boards like that, thus the gaps when putting the frame together. I am sure that with some patience and elbow grease the gaps can be eliminated/reduced, but right now patience is not abundant around here. This is my first attempt to something like this so I am already pretty proud how it came out. So for now, I'll be weak and use some putty/filler. I plan to do some kind of V grooves in the joints so that might help camouflage a bit.

    Thanks for all the input. I'm sure I'll come back with some more questions before I'm done. Right now I want to finish, learn a bit from my mistakes, and I'll probably make a second set slowly.

  9. #9
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    RE: RE%3A Newbie with the most stupid question.

    Quote of the day: You get what you pay for (Have I heard that before???)

    I found out why my jointing in the router table was not working. The "toy" Craftsman table's fence is nowhere near straight. Duh. And while I was at it I checked the table. You guessed it. Not flat.

    So it's back in the box and will return it tomorrow. I will get the "professional" model, that has an aluminum table & fence. It is the same as the Bosch.

    In my next life I'll make sure I consider space for a shop where I can have some sturdier equipment.

  10. #10
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    RE: Newbie with the most stupid question.

    A lot of furniture is made with the edges of the pieces rounded over as a feature that also hides poor fitting, not a substitute for perfection, but usually looks better than filler.

    Frank C.
    Sawdust Making 101
    http://sawdustmaking.com
    Frank C

    Sawdust Making 101
    http://sawdustmaking.com

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