From Oak Trees … to Lumber … to Projects

A couple of weeks ago, in Woodworker’s Journal eZine Issue 310, Woodworker’s Journal editor in chief Rob Johnstone wrote in his introductory editorial about a friend who’d questioned him on the viability of cutting his own lumber for a project. Rob asked eZine readers if any of them had ever chopped a tree down, turned it into lumber and built a project. Many of them had — including Herb Brodie, who shares his story here.

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Cherry End Table

It’s been a while since we’ve posted a reader project here on the blog but that doesn’t mean there haven’t been some great submissions! This end table showcases shaping skills on the legs and top, along with a forward-thinking finishing choice.

I made this end table made from 4/4 plain cherry. I adapted the design from a wall table design. My wife “put in an order” for an end table with a European provincial look.

Top is made of 2 pieces of biscuited (#20 biscuits) cherry 13″ long x 15″wide. Top upper edges were routed with 1/4″ stem 1″ cove bit. Top overhands stretchers by 1″, overall height is 21″. Legs were sculpted using saber saw.

The was finished in Minwax cherry stain #235 and Minwax Wipe On Polyurethane. I chose poly since the top would be subjected to drink glasses. Final coat was sanded ever so lightly with 1200 just to remove any “fuzz..” So far so good!

– Stan Feinberg, Wantagh, NY

Do you have a project you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

cherry table

cherry table in use

cherry table underside

Three-Wood Desk & Chair

This reader’s project skillfully combines three different species without sacrificing the pieces’ cohesive looks.

This is a desk and chair I recently made for my granddaughter that now has a place to do her homework. It’s made from leftover oak, maple, and walnut. The top is made from walnut plywood left from a dining table project and quarter-sawn oak edging remaining from a rocking chair project. The front chair legs are made from a piece of 100-year-old oak beam salvaged from a barn demolition. Does this make it a “green” project?

– Paul Douglass; Centennial CO

Do you have a project you’d like to share? Click here to send it in.

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

desk and chair

Arts & Crafts End Tables

We may not have posted many reader projects lately, but that doesn’t mean you’ve stopped making them! Some nice stock selection for the tops and eye-catching drawer joinery help make these tables stand out in any setting.

Here are a few pictures of some arts and crafts inspired end tables I built. All mortise and tenon joinery, with a sand cast bronze drawer pull. The finish consists of General’s Mission Oak Gel Stain, topped with two coats of amber shellac and wax.

Steve Pedersen

Do you have a project you’d like to share? Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

tables

table top

drawer face

Tile-Topped Coffee Table

This reader-submitted coffee table features hand-made joinery and a clever use of tile for the tabletop.

I wanted to share this project that I’m so proud of: a custom built coffee table with marble stone tiles on top.

To use stone tiles for the top of a table is a great way to give furniture a more luxurious feel without spending a lot of money. Me and my husband built this table from scratch without using any nails or screws, but instead doing a lot of chiseling and some gluing. We chose hemlock wood and stained it in red mahogany.

For the top, we used 12 x 12 inch white carrera marble tiles, which we put close together without any space savers; then we didn’t have to use grout and could create a more seamless surface.

Overall I love this technique and our coffee table is just gorgeous!

More info and pics available here:

http://christonium.com/HomeProject/building-wooden-coffee-table-with-marble-tiles

Thanks so much for your time!

Linn

Do you have a project you’d like to share? Click here to send it in.

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

table 4

table 2

table 3

table 5

table 1

Airplane Bed

This reader’s project incorporates some clever “interactive” functionality and plenty of storage.

A family I work with has a son who is crazy about airplanes. The mother sent me a picture of an airplane bed, and I knew I could do better. Attached are the sketchup design, a few pictures of the work in progress and the finished bed with Paulito included. I was disappointed that they added the box springs, as I had designed it for a single bunk mattress only, but I was told when Paulito goes to bed, he feels he is really flying.

It is made from hard maple, padauk, and Peruvian walnut. There is a little maple plywood and veneer, but it is mostly solid lumber with no stain or paint. I made two propellers which are easily removed. One is maple and the other is padauk and walnut. The wings pull out and form a storyteller’s seat, and the propeller really turns. There is plenty of storage in the drawers on the base.

– Joe Byron

Do you have a project you’d like to share? Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

Paulitos Bed - SketchUp

paulitos airplane bed frame

Airplane Bed complete

Airplane  Bed in place

Gifts from the Woodworker’s Journal Staff

Woodworker’s Journal staff members turn to a certain favorite hobby when the holidays come around. Now that we won’t be spoiling any surprises, here are some of our projects given as gifts this year.

Almost two years ago, our family was fortunate enough to take a trip to Africa, and we purchased an original watercolor painting from our guide to remember our time in the Masai Mara National Reserve. My wife has wanted it framed ever since, and now it is. Her Christmas gift is made of cherry back-banded with walnut. I used half-lap miter joints to bring the frame members together and added a beaded profile to the walnut to create shadow lines. She loves it. – Chris Marshall, Field Editor

frame

frame corner

I built something recently for my wife. It isn’t technically a Christmas present, but it was a holiday-related gift to her and the theatrical company she works for: Shakespeare Santa Cruz. They were doing a holiday show called “A Year With Toad and Frog” a musical that’s for both children and adults. It’s a donation box on a stand made from Douglas fir. The box joints are all mortise and tenon, and the top mitered frame is joined together with Festool Dominoes. – Sandor Nagyszalanczy, Contributing Editor

Collection Box

This was my first holiday season as a woodworker, but once I got the idea to make one gift, it quickly spiraled out of control and before I knew it, I was even making gifts for people I hadn’t seen or spoken to in months. In addition to numerous turned pens and bottle openers, I completed not one but five butcher-block cutting boards (technically six if you count the one I cut in half). The cutting board pictured is the one I gave to my wife – the majority of the board is walnut and cherry, with the edges done in purpleheart and zebrawood. – Matt Becker, Internet Production Coordinator

Maple Burl Pen

bottle opener

cutting board

Country Style Pantry

The unique drawer joinery, two-tone wood and clever integration of the drawer pulls into the faces bring some clever touches to an already-impressive piece.

This is a country style pantry that I built for our new home. Two-toned white oak with a dark brown dye stain for the main cabinets and clear gel varnish for the final top coat. There are 22 small item drawers (6″x6″x15″) in the center and 4 larger drawers between the upper and lower outer cabinets. I used glass doors to add ever changing color to the kitchen and a flemish glass pattern to defuse the contents of the pantry portion of the cabinets. Clear glass was used on top for display. Over all dimensions are approximately 96″ x 96″ x 16″.

– Leon Bridges

Do you have a project you’d like to share? Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

pantry full

pantry door

pantry drawer

pantry bottom

Changing Table and Dresser – All in One!

While many projects can be somewhat timeless, furniture for babies & children may lose some of its usefulness after time. This reader found a great way to extend the functionality of his work.

I made this changing table for the baby of my brother-in-law and later I made the top that he could add on to modify to a dresser.

So the furniture has a second life, and maybe his daughter will change her baby on the same changing table.

Made of yellow birch.

– Denis Pinard; Sherbrooke, Quebec

Do you have a project you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in.

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

changing table

dresser

Two Pair of Cradles

This reader’s project may make you think you’re seeing double – twice!

The first two pictures are of 2 cradles I made for my twins. The second picture is of 2 doll cradles I made for my twins by scaling down the same plans.

– Mike Collinsworth; Xenia, OH

Do you have a project you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in.

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

cradles

cradles 2

doll cradles