Blanket Chest

Reader Denzil Bell sent in these photos of a blanket chase using three different wood species.

Here are some photos of a chest I made for my grandson.  The project is made of cherry (cut by the recipient’s great grandfather), walnut and hard maple.

- Denzil Bell; Temperance, MI

Do you have a project that you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

Blanket Chest 1

Blanket Chest 2

Blanket Chest Inscription 1

Blanket Chest Inscription 2

What’s New in the August Issue

We publishing folks live and die by the “master calendar,” and according to ours here at Woodworker’s Journal, the August print issue is off the press and in the mail. You should be receiving your copy any day now. So, in between cutting the grass, angling for bass or getting those summer woodworking projects going, be sure to give your new magazine a close look. It’s chock-full of summer sizzlers you won’t want to miss:

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Closer Look at Our Full-featured Miter Saw Station

Chris Marshall shows us around his Ultimate Miter Saw Station, featured in the June 2010 issue of Woodworker’s Journal magazine.

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

EDITOR’S NOTE: Due to the enormous amount of interest in this project, we have made the Ultimate Miter Saw Stand (including the plans for the entire project and the optional Scrap Bins, as well as the Cutting List) available as a Downloadable Plan in our online store. Click here to purchase and receive the plan immediately!

Hot Spots for Cool Lumber

Photo courtesy Todd Damon, Wood Werks Supply.

In a recent eZine issue, Rob asked you all to tell him which wood species is your favorite. Not surprisingly, and to our delight, the emails poured in. He was downright cyber buried! If you didn’t happen to read his editorial, click here to catch up.

So, now that we know which woods are good as gold to you, I want to ask the logical extension to his question: Where do you get the wood you love most?

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Rollin, Rollin, Rollin…

I just wrapped up a project made from almost five sheets of plywood. As you can imagine, that’s a lot of surface area to cover with finish. And, here in the North Country, we’re still in the “deep freeze,” so all of my shop windows and doors are closed up tight. Good ventilation was going to be a challenge during finishing. I also needed to complete the entire finishing process in the shop, which definitely isn’t a “clean room” situation. It’s dusty, especially with the furnace running. So, I knew I’d need a fast-drying finish, too.  At least that would help cut down on the magnetic effect that wet finish seems to have on dust and grit.

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Getting it Done in ’10

Ah, resolutions…

Depending on how you look at them, they could be the best or worst part of flipping the calendar to January.

Here are my plans for 2010: instead of vowing to drop 20 pounds or remodel my basement—both of which are equally unlikely—I’ve made a couple of woodworking-related resolutions this year. The first one should be easy to pull off:

1. I’m gonna tame my tangled mess of air compressor hose.

Sounds ridiculously easy, doesn’t it? Right now, it lays on the floor in a pile where it gets in my way, because the hose has a memory to it and doesn’t coil up easily. I kick it around and shove it here and there, but I need a better solution. Retractable? Maybe hung from the ceiling? This year I’m going to figure something out. (Advice anyone?)

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Whaddja Give? Whaddja Get?

I’m finally coming around from the self-induced food coma of Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. The wrapping paper is waiting in a big bag for the next run to the recycling center and, for the most part, the gifts are put away.

It sure comes and goes quickly, doesn’t it?

But, during this little lull between Christmas and New Years, and before these big holidays are entirely behind us, I want to put the brakes on for a minute. Seems like a perfect opportunity for us to reflect on the cool things we made and gave away as gifts. Or, maybe someone left you something particularly shiny and sharp under the tree this year. A new handplane or dado set, perhaps? Maybe some great new gizmo from your favorite woodworking supplier—or just as nice, a gift certificate to said supplier?!

So, tell us, whaddja give? whaddja get?

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Pivot-Hinge End Table

Here’s a couple of pictures of a corner table I made -
Cherry, tiger maple, birch burl.
Les Thede, Ada, OH

These photos of a unique pivot-hinge end table come from Les Thede of Ada, OH

Here’s a couple of pictures of a corner table I made: Cherry, tiger maple, birch burl.

Have you got a project you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Content Coordinator

end_table1

end_table2

Still Skidding

Who knew there were so many uses for pallets? You do, and the comments prove it.

Who knew there were so many uses for pallets? You do, and the comments prove it.

What a nice response we’ve had from you folks to our recent blog post about turning skids into usable lumber (“Skid Row”). Looks like we tapped into a good topic here. Keep your comments and suggestions coming in, please!

I’ve taken a bit of a hiatus lately from the blog to get a big tool review ready for the January print issue of the magazine. And, aside from a lot of heavy lifting to hit that deadline, it’s added a third floor to my growing tower of skids outside the shop. Looks like it’s time to start cutting some of them up and figuring out what to build…

In that regard, I thought it might be fun to tally up all the many ways you have commented that you use skid lumber. Hopefully you’ll give the rest of us some good ideas for turning pallets into projects:

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Splinter: A Supercharged Study in Wooden Design

All Images courtesy Joe Harmon Design.

All images courtesy Joe Harmon Design and used by permission.

If wood is strong enough for a bridge and light enough for a speedboat or airplane wing, why not use it to build a high-performance supercar?

This sort of thinking must have kept Joe Harmon, an Industrial Design graduate student of North Carolina State University, up late at night, because that’s exactly what he set out to do for his graduate project: build a fully functional, supercharged automobile almost entirely out of wood.

Yep, wood.

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