Kiwi Window Trim…It Really is a Small World

This spring I moved into a new shop, and I’m finally getting around to doing the finish carpentry to wrap up the interior work. I decided to save some money and run the base molding, door and window trim myself. Every now and again, I really like this sort of trim work, and the contractor’s budget is long since spent.

To keep things moving forward on a Saturday afternoon, I decided to purchase my window and door trim from the local home center. It’s simply off-the-shelf 1x radiata pine — nice, clean and straight material that I could pretty much sand, cut and install. Now I wouldn’t think of pine as a home center species that would come from great distances — especially another hemisphere for gosh sakes — but this batch sure did. The SKU tag says it’s from, of all places, New Zealand.

Continue reading

The Cheap, Good Wood

Longleaf Pine Forest

USDA Forest Service Archive, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

I know. The words cheap and good usually aren’t used together when the subject is wood for woodworking. But in the case of the Southern yellow pines, this wording is well-suited.

Southern yellow pine is a catchall phrase for all of the Southern pines. They include loblolly, shortleaf, slash, longleaf and Virginia, as well as some other minor species. They are commonly known as “softwoods” and are mostly sold as dimensional lumber for construction.

Continue reading

Intarsia Barn

A diverse collection of different wood species, including a very appropriate use of old barn wood, really helps bring this reader-submitted project to life.

Made with African Paduak for the roof, regular “Old Barn Wood” for the barn itself, Blue Pine for the window panes, limbs from the Birch trees in my back yard, poplar for the trees themselves, a piece of Walnut for the barn door, an old 2X6 for the base of the piece, and a piece of 1/4″ plywood for the backing and the clouds.

– Jim Palmer; Jim’s Wood-n-Stuff; Ephrata, WA

Do you have a project you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

intarsia barn

intarsia barn 2

Pine Chest

With so many readers saying one of their favorite parts about woodworking is giving their projects away to loved ones and strangers alike, it’s no surprise that this project ended up as a wedding gift (and with little time to spare).

Here are some pictures of a pine chest I made for my daughters wedding in October. As you can see it is lined with cedar on the inside and has oak slats on the outside. The brass hardware is solid cast brass and the hinges, handles and hasp are all hand forged (by various artisans around the country). Sorry for the background in these pictures, but as you might imagine, I was working on it up until three days before the wedding, and then it was loaded into the back of my pickup for an 800 mile ride.

– Steve Pedersen; El Cerrito, California

Do you have a project that you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

pine chest front

pine chest corner

pine chest top back

pine chest open

Oversize Pine Dining Room Table

With so many different table designs out available, sometimes the simplest design is best, especially with some nicely-figured lumber to work with.

Oversize Pine dining room table with bread board ends. 8-1/2 feet long by 44 inches wide with 2-inch thick table top stock.

– Dexter B. Johnson II

Do you have a project you’d like to share? Click here to send it in.

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

pine table 1

pine table 2

pine table 3

pine table 4

Fresh February Content Coming Soon!

Even though we’re just days away from Christmas, our staff has propelled “full speed ahead” into 2011 to bring you lots of fine content for the February print issue. It’s due to arrive in your mailbox very soon. But Matt Becker, our Internet Coordinator, says I can share some details about the articles you’ll be reading at your leisure shortly. And so I will…let’s get a jump on the new year straight away!

Continue reading

Chest of Drawers

This reader’s project submission comes all the way from the Mediterranean (unless there’s a town called Cyprus I’m not aware of…):

This is a double length chest of draws made for a customer with a turned bowl and spoon thrown in as a gift as I do on most of my projects. The chest is made of Swedish pine to match existing bedroom furnishings.

Peter Grice, Cyprus

If you’ve got a project you’d like to share, click here to send it in.  You never know, it could be our next blog post!

Matt Becker
Content Coordinator

Chest of Drawers

Getting it Done in ’10

Ah, resolutions…

Depending on how you look at them, they could be the best or worst part of flipping the calendar to January.

Here are my plans for 2010: instead of vowing to drop 20 pounds or remodel my basement—both of which are equally unlikely—I’ve made a couple of woodworking-related resolutions this year. The first one should be easy to pull off:

1. I’m gonna tame my tangled mess of air compressor hose.

Sounds ridiculously easy, doesn’t it? Right now, it lays on the floor in a pile where it gets in my way, because the hose has a memory to it and doesn’t coil up easily. I kick it around and shove it here and there, but I need a better solution. Retractable? Maybe hung from the ceiling? This year I’m going to figure something out. (Advice anyone?)

Continue reading

Still Skidding

Who knew there were so many uses for pallets? You do, and the comments prove it.

Who knew there were so many uses for pallets? You do, and the comments prove it.

What a nice response we’ve had from you folks to our recent blog post about turning skids into usable lumber (“Skid Row”). Looks like we tapped into a good topic here. Keep your comments and suggestions coming in, please!

I’ve taken a bit of a hiatus lately from the blog to get a big tool review ready for the January print issue of the magazine. And, aside from a lot of heavy lifting to hit that deadline, it’s added a third floor to my growing tower of skids outside the shop. Looks like it’s time to start cutting some of them up and figuring out what to build…

In that regard, I thought it might be fun to tally up all the many ways you have commented that you use skid lumber. Hopefully you’ll give the rest of us some good ideas for turning pallets into projects:

Continue reading