New Porter-Cable Tools to be Released This Fall

Next week, several members of our staff and myself will be headed to the International Woodworking Fair (IWF) in Atlanta, GA, for three days of new tool overkill. We’ll be filling you all in on our IWF blog during the show, with both video and text coverage from the heart of the action.

But that’s then.

Yesterday afternoon, Porter-Cable held a new product webinar to unveil five new tools that will be available mid to late October. These folks aren’t gonna wait till Atlanta to start dishing the new goods!

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A Tool By Any Other Name…

Tool InspectorOur recent Woodworker’s Journal eZine Industry Interview with Rockwell Tools engendered quite a few comments, some of them unprintable, with the general take that if the tools are Asian-made, the name means little. While I will not agree with the contextual argument that an Asian-made tool is, without exception, of lower quality than a U.S.-made tool, I do agree that brand names move around a good bit.

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In Defense of An Old Friend

Sometimes the first tool you reach for points out an instinctive favorite. One of mine is Porter-Cable's 690 router.

Sometimes the first tool you reach for is a personal favorite. One of mine is Porter-Cable's 690 fixed-base router.

Lately I’ve been churning out a lot of router dovetails, and that, of course, means choosing a router. I’ll be honest with you: I’ve got several different routers on the shelf. But what did I reach for first? My good old Porter-Cable 690LRVS with a fixed base.

And that got me thinking about favorite tools.

Now, you’ll notice that Porter-Cable isn’t sponsoring this blog post. They don’t even know I’m writing it. It was just me, alone in the shop as usual on a Monday morning, and the thought process was about this simple: “Gotta rout dovetails this week…need a router…grab the 690.” My gut drove the decision.

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Splinter: A Supercharged Study in Wooden Design

All Images courtesy Joe Harmon Design.

All images courtesy Joe Harmon Design and used by permission.

If wood is strong enough for a bridge and light enough for a speedboat or airplane wing, why not use it to build a high-performance supercar?

This sort of thinking must have kept Joe Harmon, an Industrial Design graduate student of North Carolina State University, up late at night, because that’s exactly what he set out to do for his graduate project: build a fully functional, supercharged automobile almost entirely out of wood.

Yep, wood.

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