Posts Tagged ‘Red Oak’

Laundry Table & Cabinet

June 21st, 2011 by
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With a project like this in the house, it almost makes you WANT to get the laundry done…

This is the built in laundry table / cabinet I made for our laundry room. The cabinet is 24″x74″ and is made from 3/4″ Birch plywood and red oak trim. The drawers are poplar with birch plywood bottoms and the drawer fronts are solid red oak strips laminated onto 1/2″ MDF, the base is 2×12 pine with a 1/4″ birch plywood skin, and the counter top is 25″x75″x2 black concrete backfilled with white Portland cement, polished and seal with food safe bees wax. The cabinet finish is 3 coats of satin General Finishes Arm-R-Seal. The entire unit weighs almost 400 lbs and had to be installed on site 1 piece at a time.

- Eric Ritschel; Jacksonville, FL

If you’d like some more inspiration for your laundry room, check out this other reader-submitted project.

Do you have a project you’d like to share? Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

laundry table

Red Oak Cabinet

April 30th, 2010 by
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Our international readers continue to submit some great projects.

Attached is a cabinet I made from red oak which was left over from a hotel restoration after Hurricane Ike. There are 60 mortise and tenon joints in the frame alone.

I live in the Turks & Caicos Islands where I have to import everything, including  lumber.

Seamus Day
Turks & Caicos Islands

Do you have a project you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

Oak Cabinet

Oak Cabinet - Angle

Oak Cabinet Frame

The Value of Roughing It

October 16th, 2009 by
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There are cheaper ways to buy quality stock that with bar codes on it, but you'll have to tool up to make the most of those savings.

There are cheaper ways to buy quality stock than with bar codes on it, but you'll have to tool up to make the most of those savings.

When I started woodworking, and my tool budget was really lean, I bought my boards from the home center. It seemed logical to shop there. They were already surfaced, and that was necessary because I didn’t have a jointer and planer. Plus, I could see the knots, pitch pockets and splits easily, which gave me some confidence that I was finding the best of what was available.

I’d dig through the stack looking for the straight stuff. Usually I could find a few good pieces. If I couldn’t, I’d settle for less and live with some twisting and cupping. I didn’t like it, but what could I do? Even then I knew I was spending too much money on that wood. And, I was.

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