Curvy Jewelry Box

This unique project could arguably be considered more beautiful than anything that could be put in its drawers.

This is a jewelry box that I finished just in time for my daughters birthday. The case is curly maple. I popped the grain with amber dye, sanded back to reveal the long grain.

The front door and the drawer fronts were cut from a piece of Indonesian Rosewood that I book-matched.

The legs and pulls are also rosewood. The standoffs for the legs are walnut.

The finish is home-brewed Maloof oil. I applied Butcher’s wax a couple of weeks after the oil cured.

The drawers are all lined with red felt and have maple dividers. - Al Bibbero; Boulder, CO

Click here to see this great project!

Kamba Carving from the Heart of Kenya

Last month, my family and I had the unique opportunity to travel to Kenya, Africa, for two weeks. My wife had professional reasons for being there, but I’ll admit that I went with the typical intentions of a Westerner—to see a world of new wildlife and experience Kenyan culture. I was richly rewarded on both of those accounts. Exotic wildlife is plentiful in the country’s many national parks. And, the Kenyans we met, both in cities and small villages, were warm, welcoming and very willing to share their lives with us.

Still, the curiosities of a woodworker don’t take a back seat, just because a guy spends a couple weeks out of the shop.

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Yellowstone Hotel Shares Marquetry on Grand Scale

1930s cartography, with woodworking panache!

1930s cartography, with woodworking panache!

If Yellowstone National Park is on your short list of future vacation destinations, be sure to stop and see Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel on the park’s northwest corner. It’s a wonderful vintage building in its own right, but the hotel also contains a remarkable example of marquetry you won’t want to miss! I stumbled on it almost by accident while staying there for a night last summer.

On the wall of the hotel’s lounge, just off the main lobby, there’s a huge map of the United States made almost entirely of wood. Designed and assembled in 1937 by Robert C. Reamer and W. H. Fay, the map measures 17 ft. 10 in. wide by 10 ft. 4 in. tall. It contains 15 types of wood from nine countries: zebrawood (Africa), lacewood and Oriental (sic) wood (Australia), Brazilian rosewood, satinwood (Central America), East Indian rosewood, gray and white harewood (England), English oak, Honduras mahogany, teak (India), as well as slash and straight-grained walnut, maple and burl redwood from the United States.

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