New Table Saw Safety Regulations Proposed


Listening to the radio on my way to work this morning, I overheard this story:

http://www.npr.org/2011/06/15/137192588/product-safety-commission-to-draft-table-saw-regs

Should you decide not to listen to the 5 minute segment linked above (although it’s definitely worth it), a brief synopsis from the NPR site:

NPR has learned that federal regulators are taking steps toward new safety requirements for table saws. These saws have open spinning blades and can cause severe injuries. But the industry is resisting additional requirements.

table sawThere’s quite a bit of information discussed in the story that our readers are likely already familiar with, as there has been quite a bit of real and virtual ink spent on this topic (including related to Rob’s editorial from our most recent April Fool’s Day eZine – once again, IT WAS A JOKE … at the time … ).

However, it would appear that there continues to be wind in the sails of this movement.  What are your reactions to this latest information?

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

PS - If you have opinions that you’d like to share with the Consumer Products Safety Commission, below is a link to send them your feedback:

http://www.cpsc.gov/cgibin/info.aspx

Products for Safer Sawing

No matter how many years I’ve used a table saw, my blood still runs cold when I think about the potential for a kickback that leads to injury. Thank goodness it hasn’t happened to me. But, others in our community haven’t been so fortunate. You don’t have to search woodworking forums for too long before you’ll find direct proof. The scary photos and war stories are definitely out there. There’s no debating the fact that kickback is one of the leading causes of table saw accidents. We all know it, but what are we doing in our shops to prevent it?

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Not So Serious Business

Most of my projects don’t get many laughs. Or at least, I don’t intend them to.

I bet you’re probably in the same boat. We woodworkers spend a lot of time thinking about form, function, good technique, the right material choices, durability, safety and so forth. Most projects have an intended and practical purpose. And, I think those are all good aims. Materials are expensive, and shop time is often pretty short. Not to mention the fact that if you actually make your living—or even part of it—from the furniture or cabinetry you build, there’s not a lot of room for funny business. You follow your plans, turn out good work and move on to the next challenge. Get ‘er done.

That’s why some lighthearted woodworking is a really nice change of pace to see now and again. Take, for instance, this little YouTube gem a friend of mine sent me recently:

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Got Rules for Your Tools?

When it comes to staying organized, drawers work for me.

When it comes to staying organized, drawers work for me.

“Put things back where you find them.”

Can you still hear that one ringing in your ears from childhood? I can, but in my shop, it’s one rule I really do try to live by.

Some woodworkers wonder what kind of real work gets done in a clean shop. I guess for those folks, clutter helps get the creative juices flowing, or at least it doesn’t grind productivity to a halt. But the “Oscar Madison” approach sure doesn’t work for me. Continue reading

Grinders Bite Back

Common sense has to guide all of our actions and reactions when working with shop machinery—even the relatively "safe" tools.

Common sense has to guide all of our actions and reactions when working with shop machinery—even when using those relatively "safe" tools.

The other day, while grinding a fresh edge on my turning chisels, I was reminded of a rather searing injury from my past. It’s proof that sometimes the “safe” tools are the ones that bite you back. Here’s what happened…

You might remember an Arts & Crafts Wine Cabinet I built for the magazine back in the August 2003 issue. I was nearly finished with the project and ready to hang the doors. The hinge screws were all a little too long to work right, so I decided to grind them down instead of buying shorter ones. Nothing particularly unsafe about that.

Or so I thought.

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