Posts Tagged ‘Walnut’

Bullets and Black Walnut

September 26th, 2012 by
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Walnut With BulletsLast winter I was visiting a friend in Mississippi near Vicksburg. The farm at which I was staying is located on a road that leads directly to that city’s famous battlefield. In fact, the Confederate army marched down that very road to get to the fight. While I was talking to my host about the battle of Vicksburg and the national park that is located at the battlefield, he mentioned a tree. Apparently, this tree had the unlucky fate of being located directly between significant numbers of soldiers of the two opposing armies. When the bullets started to fly, and then continued flying for a long, long time — the tree was one of the early casualties of the battle. According to my host, so many bullets hit the tree that it eventually fell over from the weight of the lead embedded in its wood fibers.

Not so long ago, I was reminded of that story as I built a table that would be featured in the print magazine. (Woodworker’s Journal, October, 2012 … Walnut Game Table) As I was preparing the stock for the table, I noticed a couple of voids in the wood. Walnut Game TableThinking it was insect damage, I continued to plane the stock to thickness. Then I noticed that the bug holes were shiny.

Turning off the machine, I took a close look and found that the wood was full of bullet holes … and bullets. There were too many slugs to be found in these chunks of wood to be a random shot … my guess is that someone had hung a target up on a black walnut tree. (Unless, perhaps, it was in some less well-known battle!) Now, I’ve found bullets in boards before. It is not too uncommon and, if you surface a lot of wood, you’ll run into some sooner or later. But I have never before found so many bullets in such a small stash of wood. It was an odd but enjoyable event in my shop … and one that I thought you might get a kick out of.

Rob Johnstone

Editor in Chief

 

Three-Wood Desk & Chair

March 28th, 2012 by
7 Comments »

This reader’s project skillfully combines three different species without sacrificing the pieces’ cohesive looks.

This is a desk and chair I recently made for my granddaughter that now has a place to do her homework. It’s made from leftover oak, maple, and walnut. The top is made from walnut plywood left from a dining table project and quarter-sawn oak edging remaining from a rocking chair project. The front chair legs are made from a piece of 100-year-old oak beam salvaged from a barn demolition. Does this make it a “green” project?

- Paul Douglass; Centennial CO

Do you have a project you’d like to share? Click here to send it in.

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

desk and chair

Airplane Bed

January 16th, 2012 by
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This reader’s project incorporates some clever “interactive” functionality and plenty of storage.

A family I work with has a son who is crazy about airplanes. The mother sent me a picture of an airplane bed, and I knew I could do better. Attached are the sketchup design, a few pictures of the work in progress and the finished bed with Paulito included. I was disappointed that they added the box springs, as I had designed it for a single bunk mattress only, but I was told when Paulito goes to bed, he feels he is really flying.

It is made from hard maple, padauk, and Peruvian walnut. There is a little maple plywood and veneer, but it is mostly solid lumber with no stain or paint. I made two propellers which are easily removed. One is maple and the other is padauk and walnut. The wings pull out and form a storyteller’s seat, and the propeller really turns. There is plenty of storage in the drawers on the base.

- Joe Byron

Do you have a project you’d like to share? Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

Paulitos Bed - SketchUp

paulitos airplane bed frame

Airplane Bed complete

Airplane  Bed in place

Woodworking Lessons, Learned Firsthand

November 7th, 2011 by
1 Comment »

First things first – I’m not a woodworker. Actually, I WASN’T a woodworker. Longtime followers of the blog know that while I certainly appreciate the beauty, precision and creativity of this craft, I haven’t been someone that uses wood to make things that look good, serve a purpose, or both.

That all changed a couple months ago. Long story short, I decided that after almost four years of working with some pretty amazing woodworkers, it was time to join the party.

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Finishing Wizardry

October 31st, 2011 by
5 Comments »

Accent TableIn a recent conversation with our field editor Chris Marshall about project I’m working on that involves walnut (which I’ll discuss in an upcoming post), he told me a story about a unique finishing situation that he ran into.  I thought it would be a great thing to share…
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Don’t Be Afraid to Ask!

September 21st, 2011 by
9 Comments »

Woodworking is anything but a simple craft. Every technique, finish option, tool choice or species of wood has innumerable issues related to it. “Can I cut a rabbet with a spiral bit?” “Should I try waterbased poly over rosewood?” “What’s the best size of air compressor for both fastening and spraying finish? “How do I keep end grain on a walnut blank from tearing out when I turn it?

You get the picture. Start a project or try something new and the questions surface, no matter what.

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Intarsia Barn

August 5th, 2011 by
1 Comment »

A diverse collection of different wood species, including a very appropriate use of old barn wood, really helps bring this reader-submitted project to life.

Made with African Paduak for the roof, regular “Old Barn Wood” for the barn itself, Blue Pine for the window panes, limbs from the Birch trees in my back yard, poplar for the trees themselves, a piece of Walnut for the barn door, an old 2X6 for the base of the piece, and a piece of 1/4″ plywood for the backing and the clouds.

- Jim Palmer; Jim’s Wood-n-Stuff; Ephrata, WA

Do you have a project you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

intarsia barn

intarsia barn 2

Curvy Jewelry Box

May 20th, 2011 by
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This unique project could arguably be considered more beautiful than anything that could be put in its drawers.

This is a jewelry box that I finished just in time for my daughters birthday. The case is curly maple. I popped the grain with amber dye, sanded back to reveal the long grain.

The front door and the drawer fronts were cut from a piece of Indonesian Rosewood that I book-matched.

The legs and pulls are also rosewood. The standoffs for the legs are walnut.

The finish is home-brewed Maloof oil. I applied Butcher’s wax a couple of weeks after the oil cured.

The drawers are all lined with red felt and have maple dividers. - Al Bibbero; Boulder, CO

Click here to see this great project!

A(nother) Quick Look at the New April Issue

February 23rd, 2011 by
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In addition to Chris Marshall’s preview of our April 2011 issue, Editor in Chief Rob Johnstone put this video together for those of you that would rather listen & watch than read.

Don’t have the issue yet? Click here to buy!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

Brazilian Walnut TV Stand

February 21st, 2011 by
1 Comment »

Sometimes the most unlikely wood combinations turn out better than you’d imagine…

This TV Stand is made from 3/4″ Brazilian Walnut tongue and groove flooring. I made the raised door panels from solid Brazilian Walnut from a local wood specialty store. Top Trim molding and bottom skirt are American Walnut also purchased at local store. It measures 52” wide, 30” high and 18” deep.

It is only finished with rub on urethane. No stain.

The end insert panel is made of luan which surprisingly matched the walnut.

The piece is actually much darker than the pictures show.

I will have tiny slivers to show for years. J

- David Rafferty; Bloomfield Hills, MI

Do you have a project you’d like to share?  Click here to send it in!

Matt Becker
Internet Production Coordinator

Console Front

Console Top and Front

Console Top and SIde

Console Top